World War I and America Exhibition

A series of moderated discussions will provide opportunities for those who served in more recent conflicts like Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan to bring their experiences to bear on historical events and texts. The project illuminates the lasting legacies of World War I, and the similarities and differences between past and present

Exhibits and Special Events Calendar

Date & TimeEvent
Sunday March 5 at 3 p.m. Johnnies, Tommies and Sammies World War I and America Exhibit Opener:

Slated by the Library of Congress to be one of two presentations for 2017, William Brooks, Professor of Music from the University of York, UK and five other historians bring Johnnies, Tommies and Sammies: Music and the WWI Alliance, a musical event about the contribution that music played in bringing the Allied forces together. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of the Library of America presented in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Generously sponsored by local restaurants: Submarina, Papa Joe's, White Castle and The Original Baby's.
Tuesday March 7 at 7 p.m. World War I and America Roundtable I:

The Orland Park Veteran's Commission and the Orland Park Vet Center come together to discuss key points of the World War I and America exhibit featured for the Month of March. Area veterans are encouraged to attend and participate. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of the Library of America presented in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from the National Endowment for the Humanities.
Thursday March 9 at 7 p.m. Over There - The United States Enters World War I, 1917:

A century ago, a terrorist attack in Bosnia triggered a devastating world war that impacts us still today. Although the United States tried to remain neutral, ultimately it was dragged into the war and onto the world stage as a global power. This talk will explain the events between 1914 and 1917 that led to the deployment of more than 2-million American soldiers to France, Belgium, Italy and Russia, and changed our country forever. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of the Library of America presented in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from the National Endowment for the Humanities.
Wednesday March 15 at 7 p.m. Artillery Scout - An Evening with Author James Bilder:

Bilder details a personal look at his grandfather's experiences during World War I. From a hard life in Chicago, through training and into battle, the author's father had a front row seat as an artillery scout. Books will be available for purchase and autographing. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of the Library of America presented in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from the National Endowment for the Humanities.
Friday, March 17 at 7 p.m. Showcase - The US in WWI, Seven Months That Changed The World:

Singer/Songwriter/Historian Barry Cloyd brings his original program, "The US in WWI, Seven Months That Changed The World" to the Orland Park Library on March 17, 2017 at 7:00. In it he will recount America's vital role in "The War to End All Wars" through the stories and songs of the GI's who fought in that world-changing conflict. Barry's Grandfather C.M. Cloyd Sr. was a Sergeant in France during many famous WWI battles and Cloyd will present this original program in the persona of his Grandfather. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of the Library of America presented in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from the National Endowment for the Humanities.
Sunday March 19 at 1:30 p.m. On the Home Front: An Intro to the Great War:

(Youth Services Program) Join us to learn about how the lives of Americans were affected during the Great War. See original artifacts and hear gripping stories of every day life turned upside down.
Tuesday March 21 at 7 p.m. World War I and America Roundtable II:

The Orland Park Veteran's Commission and the Orland Park Vet Center come back to discuss key points of the World War I and America exhibit featured for the Month of March. Area veterans are encouraged to attend and participate. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of the Library of America presented in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from the National Endowment for the Humanities.
Wednesday March 22 at 7 p.m. A World Gone Mad - World War I:

Historian, Jim Gibbons will take you through the first of two of the most catastrophic wars in our nation's history, World War I, which began on July 28, 1914. Gibbons will highlight significant events that thrust the United States into this unwanted war. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of the Library of America presented in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from the National Endowment for the Humanities.
Thursday March 23 at 7 p.m. Great Soldiers of the First Division, 1917 – 1919:

To put a human face on the soldiers of the AEF, Paul will share stories of some of the famous and/or interesting men and women who served in or with the First Division during World War I. The First Division was a special community that included famous names such as Theodore Roosevelt, Jr., and George C. Marshall; tough commanding generals like Robert L. Bullard and Charles R. Summerall; brave soldiers like Lieutenant Si Parker who received the Medal of Honor; and characters such as Alban Butler who, when not fighting, spent the war drawing cartoons. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of the Library of America presented in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from the National Endowment for the Humanities.
Friday, March 24 at 6 p.m. Special Friday Film: American Experience & All Quiet on the Western Front:

To coincide with the library's participation in the World War I and America grant, the library presents a special preview screening of the New PBS American Experience - The Great War followed by the timeless and original story of the common soldier's harrowing experience, All Quiet on the Western Front. This program is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of the Library of America presented in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from the National Endowment for the Humanities. (Outreach Services Program) Combined Runtime: 166 minutes
Thursday March 30 at 7 p.m. The Rise and Fall of the Doughboy:

In the 100 years since World War I, the term “doughboy” has come to refer exclusively to the soldiers of that war. However, the origins of that term go back to the infantrymen of General Scott during the war with Mexico. In this program, hear about the efforts of not only the infantrymen of World War I, but all of the doughboys in the war to end all wars. This program is part of the World War 1 and America, a two-year national initiative of Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War 1 Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

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