Staff Picks Youth Fiction

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May 2024

Only: The Bird Who Liked Being Alone

by Airlie Anderson

Only is a sweet little bird who enjoys spending time by herself. The other birds see her doing quiet activities all alone and wonder why she doesn’t always want to participate. Is she lonely, or is she happy doing things on her own? The other birds eventually realize that Only likes being by herself and that is ok! The bird teaches the other birds that it is nice to be quiet sometimes, and sometimes they can be loud and have fun with others as well. This picture book does a great job of showing how there are introverts and extroverts and each individual can decide what makes them happy! It is beautifully illustrated with vivid colors and is perfect for kids ages 4-8.

Recommended by: Stacie Pendleton, Youth Services Assistant

Posted in: Youth Fiction


April 2024

Let’s Read Animal Words

by Ji Lee

The author has visually created such a unique take on the ABC’s.  Young elementary children will enjoy their favorite animals while exploring and finding animal art in this fact filled picture book. In what looks like a simple animal image, there are fully formed words for kids to read.  Love the creative challenge this author took!
Recommended by: Lenore Garoufalis, Youth Services Assistant

Posted in: Youth Fiction


Olivetti

by Allie Millington

Olivetti is a typewriter who has saved the words that make up the memories of the family. Ernest is a seventh grade boy who hides behind words from the dictionary so he won’t become close to anyone. Ever since the Everything that Happened happened, the family has coped, but not well. When the mom disappears and Ernest feels it is his fault, Olivetti must break the typewriter code and let him know that together they can find his mom and bring the family together again.

Recommended by: Joan Stoiber, Youth Services Reference Librarian I

Posted in: Youth Fiction


New From Here

by Kelly Yang

New From Here by Kelly Yang is about ten year old Knox Wei-Evans and his family navigating the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic. His parents decide that it’s best for his dad to stay in Hong Kong to work while he and his mom and siblings move to America, where the virus hasn’t spread yet. This means Knox and his siblings are faced with new schools, new peers, and new challenges. Can they get along and work together to make the best of a difficult situation? Readers will laugh, gasp, and gain perspective throughout the story. The book also lends itself well to important, thoughtful, discussion questions.

This book is available in the library and on OverDrive/Libby as an ebook and e audiobook.

Recommended by: Erin Cady, Youth Services Reference Librarian

Posted in: Youth Fiction


March 2024

Dogtown

by Katherine Applegate

Applegate, along with another popular author, Gennifer Choldenko have co-authored a fast- paced story about finding your forever home. Dogtown is a shelter where dogs, real and robot, are housed after their owners no longer want them. Chance, a real dog, is friends with a mouse as he shares his kibble to feed Mouse’s family. Then, much to Chance’s surprise, he becomes friends with a robot dog, who seems to have a real heart and not just wires inside of him. With the three friends working together to get robot dog back home, Chance again begins to hope that his family will come and find him. One problem to that is that they are looking for a four- legged dog, and Chance now only has three legs.

Recommended by: Joan Stoiber, Youth Services Reference Librarian

Posted in: Youth Fiction


Ferris

by Kate DiCamillo

“It’s a DiCamillo!” is a quote from one of the reviews of the book and truly that sums it up. It is a must read. A heart-warming and heart-rending story of community, family, and love. During the summer before Ferris and her best friend Billy go into 5th grade, there is so much going on with those they love and those who love them, “but every story is a love story”. There is a ghost, an uncle living in the basement, illness, unrequited love, a little sister who wants to be an outlaw, bees, and raccoons. DiCamillo wraps all of that into a fantastic read that encompasses the support, caring and understanding of all the characters for each other. After finishing the book, I looked at the cover to find the sparrow…did not see it… so decided it was under the barcode label, so felt happy. Make you want to read it?

Recommended by: Joan Stoiber, Youth Services Reference Librarian

Posted in: Youth Fiction


What Was the Children’s Blizzard of 1888

by Steve Korte

Another great book in the New York Times best-selling series. It’s hard to imagine what these teachers and kids had to go through when the winds were howling a 60 mph and the temperature dropped to 40 below. Snow was coming in sideways and they couldn’t see a few feet in front of them.  Teachers had the hard decision to either send children home or weather out the storm in the one room schoolhouse.  This story gives kids a real perspective of what life was like in the 1800’s and how fortunate we are today to have the necessities that we need.
Recommended by: Lenore Garoufalis, Youth Services Assistant

Posted in: Youth Fiction


Bunny in the Middle

Bunny in the Middle by Anika Denise is a beautiful picture book story that reminds middle children how special they are. This sweet story touches on some of the trials and tribulations of being “stuck” in the middle and puts a positive spin on it. The lovely springtime illustrations, and adorable bunny siblings, make this a cozy, heartwarming read aloud. Caregivers and children will surely bond over this title. This is for all the middle children, young and old.

Recommended by: Erin Cady, Youth Services Reference Librarian

Posted in: Youth Fiction


Hannah and the Ramadan Gift

by Qasim Rashid

A charming story about the holy month of Ramadan and Eid Al-Fitr holiday. This picture book will teach children how to help people in their community. The month of Ramadan for Muslims is about being generous and forgiving, not just about fasting. If you are unfamiliar with this part of Islam, you will find the answers in this very simple, joyful story.
Recommended by: Ghada Rafati, Patron Services Clerk

Posted in: Youth Fiction


Kind of Spark

by Elle McNicoll

Addie is autistic along with her sister, Keedie. They have a very strong bond. Unfortunately, Addie’s new teacher is not kind to her and treats her differently from the other students. When Addie learns at school that in the past women were accused of being witches and burned at the stake, she feels empathy for them. She wants to commemorate them and attempts to receive permission from the village board. 

 This book is available in the library and on OverDrive/Libby as an ebook and e audiobook.

Recommended by: Becky McCormack, Youth Services Assistant Manager

Posted in: Youth Fiction


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