Staff Picks Youth Nonfiction

« All Staff Picks

September 2021

Blood and Germs: The Civil War Battle Against Wounds and Disease

by Gail Jarrow

Jarrow takes the reader back to the Civil War and explains the effects of disease and unsanitary conditions on the soldiers. Unbeknownst to doctors, microbes and parasites took the lives of more soldiers than battle wounds. Fortunately, this led to innovations that enhanced medical care going forward. 

Recommended by: Becky McCormack, Youth Services Assistant Director

Posted in: Youth Nonfiction


If the World Were 100 People: a Visual Guide to Our Global Village

by Jackie McCann

An eye-opening written and visual account using 2021 statistics as if the 8 billion people populating the Earth were only 100 people. Numbers that we can wrap our heads around as to who speaks what language, who is hungry, who has clean water, etc.

Recommended by: Joan Stoiber, Youth Services Reference Librarian I

Posted in: Youth Nonfiction


August 2021

Flint Water Crisis

by Julie Knutson

What happens when the water supply for a large city becomes unsafe? Considered a major environmental catastrophe, this book investigates the causes and impacts of using a new water resource for the city of Flint, MI.

Recommended by: Joan Stoiber, Youth Services Reference Librarian I

Posted in: Youth Nonfiction


July 2021

Where is the Taj Mahal?

by Dorothy and Thomas Hoobler

As one of the most beautiful buildings in the world, the Taj Mahal is designated as “the Jewel of Muslim Art in India”. The Taj Mahal tomb was built from a blend of Persian, Mongol and Islamic styles that includes a mosque and lovely gardens. The most interesting fact behind the reason for this magnificent building is a true love story. I suggest reading this book if you want to know more about the Taj Mahal’s history. It is a good read for ages 8 and up, as well as adults.

Recommended by: Ghada Rafati, Patron Services Clerk

Posted in: Youth Nonfiction


June 2021

The Gravity Tree: the True Story of a Tree That Inspired the World

by Anna Crowley Redding

A fascinating read about the tree that grew from a small seed into a tree that dropped the apple with Sir Isaac Newton sitting under it. And that is only the beginning. The tree has influenced other thinkers as well as ordinary people to potentially change the world. Seedlings have been transported all over the world and out of this world to the International Space Station. Over three hundred years later the tree still lives as do the inspired ideas brought on by it.

Recommended by: Joan Stoiber, Youth Services Reference Librarian I

Posted in: Youth Nonfiction


May 2021

Animals!: Here We Grow

by Shelley Rotner

An engaging look at the beauty of transformation in nature for preschoolers and emerging readers. On this visual introduction to life cycles, children will learn the different stages of growth of diverse species. Up-close photographs are presented in large panels to depict animal development. The large and simple text introduces the concepts with appropriate terminology. Whether your child is an independent reader or you enjoy reading together, this one is a great pick for nature lovers and inquisitive minds.

Recommended by: Fanny Camargo, Youth Services Reference Librarian I

Posted in: Youth Nonfiction


The Little Witch’s Book of Spells

by Ariel Kusby

This book will help you find the magic in yourself! It is a wonderful book for all ages and genders. It will help inspire you to slow down, play, and find various forms of magic in your surroundings. It is an incredibly sweet and empowering little book, perfect for aspiring witches, wizards, and others who seek a bit of magic in their lives.

Recommended by: Erin Faxel, Teen Librarian

Posted in: Youth Nonfiction


April 2021

Celebrating Ramadan

by Diane Hoyt-Goldsmith

A good timing recommending this religious book where Muslims worldwide are now celebrating the month of Ramadan. This book talks about Ibraheem the fourth-grade student who lives with his family in New Jersey. “Celebrating Ramadan” explains how a Muslim family with their kids can practice freely their religion in USA and also explains the Islam religion in a very simple way. If you feel like you need to know more about Islam and the month of Ramadan and how a Muslim family spends this holy month, read this book, and if you like middle eastern pastries do not miss the page where it has a recipe for making Ghorayyibah.
Recommended by: Ghada Rafati, Patron Services Clerk

Posted in: Youth Nonfiction


February 2021

If You Want a Friend in Washington: Wacky, Wild & Wonderful Presidential Pets

by Erin McGill

This is a funny and informative book about the variety of animals presidents have kept as pets at the White House. The animals range from the very small to huge, common and rare. A fun read with whimsical illustrations.

Recommended by: Joan Stoiber, Youth Services Reference Librarian I

Posted in: Youth Nonfiction


Ensnared in the Wolf’s Lair: Inside the 1944 Plot to Kill Hitler and the Ghost Children of His Revenge

by Ann Bausum

A heartbreaking and haunting account of the many immediate family members and relatives who were killed or imprisoned in camps when the plot to kill Hitler in an explosion failed. His revenge was swift and thorough, even sweeping up people who happened to share the same last name of some of the conspirators. Told from a diary secreted away by a daughter of one of the conspirator’s, this should rank with Anne Frank’s Diary of a Young Girl to show the evilness of some men, who took no account of age or innocence.

Recommended by: Joan Stoiber, Youth Services Reference Librarian I

Posted in: Youth Nonfiction


1 2 3